I hear the sirens calling
As the rain is gently falling

Sticky Shamen

shamenchristophermayhewstickerI’ve got a couple of big boxes full of music-related stuff that I have hoarded over the years – flyers, tickets, passes, a few press releases, a few promo photos, blah-de-blah. I should probably send most of it for recycling. Anyway, I thought it would be fun to pull a few things out at random, scan them, and pop them up here. Well, it’ll amuse me.

First up – and I did simply put my hand into one of the boxes and played lucky dip – is a sticker for The Shamen’s “Christopher Mayhew Says” 12-inch, a popadelic gem from 1987. The sticker is quite flimsy and very, er, blue. I wonder if they did them in other colours?

Related posts: Won’t get spooled again

The punk supper club

thelastsupperpunkbyrodakrodakThis is The Last Supper Punk by an artist called Rodakrodak. I’m afraid I can’t tell you much about Rodakrodak beyond the fact that he/she comes from Mexico – and I only know that because it says so on his/her profile at the Deviant Art website. Check out more of his/her work here.

So here’s the big question, boys and girls. How many of these iconic punk figures can you name? I reckon I’ve got 10 of the 13, maybe 11. I can give you Sid Vicious (taking the role of Jesus, no less) and Joey Ramone to help you on your way. OK, since those are probably two of the easiest to identify anyway, I’ll also chuck in Ian MacKaye from Minor Threat and Fugazi (bald bloke, green shirt, far right). Click on the image for a larger version.

Related posts: 1977 punk collage from Sounds, Jesus save Paul McCartney, Shooting John Lydon

A very large and very furry hat

This is the video for Loop Guru’s superbly otherworldly “Sussan”. It came out on Nation Records in 1994 and features Iranian singer Sussan Deyhim, who has also worked with the likes of Peter Gabriel, Jah Wobble and Jerry Garcia. I co-managed Loop Guru with my old pal James Clayton for a big chunk of the 1990s and I remember being very excited when Sussan arrived in London to hook up with the group for the first time. That’s not Sussan in the video, though. She was on her way back home by the time that was filmed.

But no matter, because someone a lot more interesting than Sussan is in there. I’m talking about the good looking guy in the very large and very furry hat. He is only in a few shots, so you will need to watch closely. Yes, dear friends, this was the start of my career as a music video extra. It was the end of it too.

For more videos, photos and other Loopy stuff, click here for a terrific Facebook group about Loop Guru. It’s run by Sam Dodson, aka Loops bass and guitar dude Salman Gita.

Heavyosity

edgarbroughtonbandIf you missed my latest Frome FM radio show (shame on you), you will no doubt be happy to learn that it is now available in the station’s online archives. Yes siree. This time round, my playlist consisted of late 1960s and early 1970s British heavy rockers, with tracks by the likes of The Pink Fairies, Deep Purple, The Groundhogs, Armageddon, Hawkwind, Black Sabbath, The Gun, Leaf Hound, Fuzzy Duck and the wonderful Edgar Broughton Band (pictured above). Get listening here.


Ralf und Jon

kraftwerktatekraftwerkjonsnowThere are vast numbers of Kraftwerk fans out there and, thanks to a telephone system made of old baked bean tins and a computer server powered by a hamster in a wheel, most of them didn’t get a ticket for the group’s week-long series of gigs at the Tate Modern in London. Somebody who did was Channel 4 News anchor Jon Snow, who is pictured here with his 3-D goggles at the “Trans Europe Express” night. The shot was posted on Twitter by Channel 4 News journalist Jennifer Rigby.

You can read a review of the “Trans Europe Express” show, which saw Ralf Hutter and his buddies also playing material from “The Man Machine” and “Computerworld”, at the Facebook page for Electronic magazine. The first two paragraphs of the review are below. Click here for the rest and don’t forget to hit the “like” button on the page while you’re there. I am talking to you too, Mr Snow. If you’re into Kraftwerk, I guarantee you’ll be into Electronic.

kraftwerktatereview


Tweeting with Keith Levene

keithlevenebyfabiolugaroI recently had a tweet from former PiL guitarist Keith Levene. He’d seen an interview I did with his old pal Jah Wobble in 1990 on my archive website (read it here) and wanted to know why I’d never interviewed him. I told him I would get to him eventually, but I’ve got to him quicker than I thought thanks to Ian Leak at Frome FM, who was putting together a special show about Keith and asked me to take part in a three-way chat with Keith for the broadcast.

The programme goes out this Wednesday (6 February) at 10.30pm and you can listen in online at the Frome FM site (click here). You’ll hear several tunes from Keith Levene’s new solo album, “Searching 4 Absolute Zero”, plus one or two old favourites. Alongside the music, Ian and I talk to Keith about the album, his PiL days, his stint in The Clash (he was a founder member of the group), his first job in the music business as a roadie for Yes, and his uncredited work on backing tracks for Ice-T and Tone Loc.

While the shows airs, Keith will be hosting a listening party on Twitter, using #keithlevenelive. Ian Leak and I will be tweeting too, so feel free join in the fun. Keith is @missingchannel, Ian is @bagpusspostgate and I’m @pushtweeting.

Keith Levene photo by Fabio Lugaro


Here comes sickness

Look, I know we’re still in January, but I don’t think I’m going to see or hear anything better than this in 2013. I mean, this is seriously good. Seriously. Fucking. Good.

The band are Manflu and the track is “Wizard”. They’re based in London, but the five members of Manflu are from five different countries – Kazakhstan, Japan, France, the US and the UK. They share a liking for Can, they’ve played with Lydia Lunch, and another of their songs is called “James Chance”. They’ve also got one about about porno queen Sasha Grey. They’re not a totally new band (they’ve been around since 2009 and “Wizard” first appeared as the lead cut on their second EP, which they released in 2011), but this video is straight out of the box. Directed by Diana Horrorshow, it was uploaded to YouTube a few days ago and has been viewed by just a couple of thousand people so far. Be the first on your block and all that.


Let there be house

fingersincNow I know you are all regular listeners to my monthly radio show on Frome FM. You can hear it online, so there really is no excuse for you not tuning in, even if you live on the other side of Somerset. Or the world, come to that. Anyway, if you’re not always able to listen in, you’ll be glad to learn that Frome FM have recently added an archive area to their site and you can find my latest broadcast there. This show features the old skool house pioneers, with tracks by the likes of Fingers Inc (pictured above), Marshall Jefferson, Frankie Knuckles, Nitro Deluxe, Sterling Void, Todd Terry and Farley “Jackmaster” Funk. Flick on your jacking switch and hear it here.


Jesus saves Paul McCartney with a glove puppet

katabillupsjesusmccartney1katabillupsjesusmccartney2This has to be one of the oddest music-related items to ever appear on eBay. It’s a painting called (and the title is just so perfect) Jesus Broke Out The Lamb Chop Puppet And Hired An Angel To Try And Cheer Up A Clinically Depressed Paul McCartney by US artist Kata Billups. Kata seems to have a bit of a thing about painting Jesus with The Beatles (and also various combinations of Jesus, Elvis Presley, Mick Jagger and pin-up queen Bettie Page) and her work is apparently owned by the likes of Julia Roberts, Sting, Tim Burton and Willie Nelson, as well as all four former members of REM.

Jesus Broke Out The Lamb Chop Puppet has been on eBay for around three years – that might be something to do with its Buy It Now price tag of $177,000 (roughly £110,000) – so you may have already seen it. If you haven’t, click here for the full listing and read Kata’s comments about the symbolism in the painting and her explanation of the cause of Paul McCartney’s suffering. There’s a clue in the fact that he has taken a red marker pen to the three pictures of Yoko Ono on the walls of his room, putting a big cross on one and drawing devil’s horns on the other two.

Kata doesn’t say much about Lamb Chop in her listing, which is a pity. But seeing the painting did make me Google Lamb Chop and I’m very pleased to report that, although the glove puppet’s creator Shari Lewis sadly died in 1998, her daughter Mallory Lewis continues to perform with the puppet to this day. Mallory and Lamb Chop’s website is here.


Don’t let the squares knock the rock

I remember my Uncle Derrick telling me that the local teddy boys slashed the seats at the cinema in King’s Lynn when they showed “Rock Around The Clock” in 1956. He was a bit vague about whether he’d joined in or not, but I suspect he might have done. There was still lots of excitement when Bill Haley And His Comets pitched up in the UK the following year, as this footage shows. The commentary – “just dig those happy cats and not a square in sight” – sounds like something from Harry Enfield and Paul Whitehouse. Marvellous.


50 tracks in 90 minutes

50tracks90minsA quick plug for my last radio show of 2012, which is on Frome FM this Sunday (9 December) from 10.30pm to midnight. I generally dip into a different genre of music each month – the show is called For One Night Only – but as it is my final broadcast of the year, I thought it would be fun to see if I can play 50 tracks in my allotted 90 minutes. It’s not even a full 90 minutes as it goes, because there are a couple of minutes of adverts in there too.

To add an extra little fizz of excitement to the occasion (come on, admit it, you’re as excited about this as I am), I’ve set myself some rules for the show. These are:

  • No manual fade-outs, so any fade has to be part of the actual track
  • No more than three tracks to be played back-to-back at a time
  • Only one song per artist, so I can’t just play loads of stuff by Napalm Death
  • I have to announce the artist and title of every track I play

I’m still putting together the playlist, but it’s going to be a right musical jumble. David Bowie, Janis Joplin, De La Soul, Wreckless Eric, Stiff Little Fingers and Air will all be in there. And don’t work yourself into a tizzy if I play a track you hate. It’ll be over before you know it. Two minutes tops. A lot less than that in most cases.

You can hear the show live online by clicking the Listen Now button at the Frome FM website, or hear it after the event by going to Programmes, then Music, then choosing For One Night Only from the list on the left and selecting the date 9 December.


Black, one sugar

I like mugs. I also like old synths. So I am very taken by the pictures-of-old-synths-on-mugs thing they’ve got going at Voltage Control.

This gorgeous creature here is the Roland TB-303 Bass Line, aka the acid house machine. Nip over to the Voltage Control website for more Roland mugs, plus others featuring bits of kit from the likes of Moog, Korg, EDP and ARP. There are Theremin, Technics and Linn Drum mugs too.

Bet you didn’t realise that The Human League’s “Being Boiled” was about a kettle, did you?


RIP Joe Maher

Flowered Up Weekender film posterI’m sad to hear the news that Flowered Up guitarist Joe Maher has died. It’s only three years since the death of Liam Maher, Flowered Up’s singer and Joe’s older brother.

Click here for an interview I did with Liam for Melody Maker around the time of the release of the band’s “Weekender” single, one of the greatest records ever made. That’s not an opinion, by the way, that’s a simple statement of fact.


Farewell to the Wirrina

The Wirrina Stadium in PeterboroughThe Damned ticket for Wirrina Stadium in Peterborough, 1979I’ve just found out that the Wirrina Stadium in Peterborough was pulled down a couple of years ago. It wasn’t really much of a stadium, it was more a grubby sports hall, but I saw quite a lot of bands play at the Wirrina in the late 1970s and early 80s, and I have fond memories of the place. Among the gigs I particularly remember were The Clash (the 1978 “Sort It Out Tour”, supported by The Slits and The Innocents), The Damned, Siouxsie And The Banshees and Madness (supported by The Go-Go’s). I wrote about The Damned’s show, which ended in something of a riot, in Rat Scabies And The Holy Grail (click here to read that part of the book over at my archive website) and the image of Ari Up from The Slits bouncing and skipping across the stage with her dreadlocks dripping in spit will stay with me for ever.

I’ve no idea what they’ve built on the site of the Wirrina, but I guess there’s every chance that it’s a Tesco or a Sainsbury’s or some other fluorescent-lit temple of consumerism. If it is, I sincerely hope that, every once in a while, some unsuspecting late-night shopper hears the sound of Ari Up singing “Shoplifting” drifting down the aisle: “Put the cheddar in me pocket / Put the rest under the jacket / Talk to the cashier, he won’t suspect / And if he does, if he does…”

Wirrina Stadium photograph courtesy of Peterborough Images


The psychedelic elephant in the room

I’ve been looking at old copies of Billboard magazine on Google Books (I owe fellow former Melody Maker journalist Rob Fitzpatrick a shandy for telling me about these) and I’ve been especially enjoying the adverts. The three examples above – for The Who, The Move and Marvin’s Circus, an obscure psychedelic beat band from Ohio who put out two singles on MGM before melting into oblivion – all appear in the 24 June 1967 edition. Click on the images for larger versions and click here for the full magazine.


Light the fuse on the shoes

Shall we have some Flipron? They’ve just brought out a new album, “Firework Shoes”, so we should, shouldn’t we?

I have been a big fan of Flipron since Rat Scabies played me some of the demo tracks they recorded at The Arch, his studio under Kew Bridge in London, way back in, oh, I guess it must around 1998, and I am amazed more people haven’t cottoned on to what a good band they are. Maybe “Firework Shoes” will do the trick. It’s produced by Rat and has Neville Staples, ex-The Specials and The Fun Boy Three, on a tune called “The Comet Returns”, which sounds like the theme music for “The Magnificent Seven” given the 2-Tone treatment. Ride ‘em, rude boy.

Elsewhere, there’s all the musical weirdosity I’ve come to expect from Flipron. There’s psychedelic honky-tonk and fairground rock ‘n’ roll and kaleidoscopic avant-jazz and neo-bubblegum blues. There’s so much colour you’d think they were sponsored by Dulux. There are lots of darkly twisted tales and esoteric musings too, with frontman Jesse Budd out-Tim Burtoning even Tim Burton. “Available for weddings, trials and beheadings / Sporting occasions, autopsies, immolations / We’re low-life seeking elevation,” he sings at one point.

Anyway, we were going to have some Flipron, right? So if you would kindly press the little orange button below, we can listen to “The Big Red Button Must Never Ever Ever Be Pressed”. Lovely.

Flipron photos by John Coles


That’s what I call a home video

So how do you make a music video without a budget? And I mean no budget at all. Not one single penny. Michele Ari – who I first wrote about here – has managed it using little more than a mobile phone and a few odds and ends she dug out from the bottom of her wardrobe. The result is pretty good too. I especially like the bit where she forgets to mime. Her recovery is terrific. The song, by the way, is the mighty catchy “Little Wars” from her “Uncharted Territory” EP.


My first record, my first music magazine

Disco 45 T-Rex Special
Jeepster by T-Rex (A-side)
Jeepster by T-Rex (B-side)

The first record I ever bought was “Jeepster” by T-Rex. I’ve still got my original copy. I’ve still got pretty much all my old records. I don’t know how many there are, but they take up an entire room. Unfortunately, I don’t have my copy of the Disco 45 T-Rex Special, which I think I am right in saying was the first music magazine I ever bought.

Disco 45 was a monthly magazine consisting mainly of song lyrics and photos. It was published by a company called Trevor Bolton Partnership and launched as a newsprint title in 1970, but was later a full-colour glossy. Despite stiff competition from magazines like Popswop, It’s Here And Now and Look-InDisco 45 kept going until 1981, when it was finally seen off by the phenomenally successful Smash Hits – as were most of the other 1970s teen magazines.


Electronic magazine

As you may have noticed – you did notice, didn’t you? – I have neglected my blog for the last few months. It’s because I’ve been stupidly busy putting together a new magazine called Electronic. It’s the Special Secret Project I talked about back in May.

Electronic is now available at WHSmiths and all good newsagents throughout the UK. You can also order it online by clicking here. Underworld are on the cover, as I’m sure you’ve already spotted, and there are also articles on The Human League, Detroit techno, Can, Gary Numan, A Guy Called Gerald, Minimal Wave, Silver Apples and the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, plus a superb Kraftwerk interview from 1977. There’s a free CD too, featuring the likes of Cabaret Voltaire, OMD, Heaven 17, Devo, Ultrazox, Fad Gadget, The Normal and Yazoo. The magazine is published by Future (the makers of mags like Classic Rock and Prog) and at the moment we are just putting out a one-off pilot issue, but there will be more if the pilot sells well.

Please click here for the magazine’s Facebook page (and don’t forget to hit the “like” button) and here to follow us on Twitter.


Flooring

This is “Two Different Ways” by Factory Floor, who are one of the most exciting bands around right now. They’ve been going since 2005 and have released a couple of corking mini-albums and a number of singles, including “Wooden Box”, which was remixed by New Order drummer Stephen Morris. He described the band’s music as “unsettling disco” in an interview with The Quietus. Factory Floor’s Nik Void recorded an album with Chris & Cosey earlier this year – credited to Carter Tutti Void – and used to be in KaitO, the noisy pop outfit, when she was known as Nikki Colk. I think I read somewhere that she’s from Norwich. Which is a fine city, as I have mentioned before.


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